From Bloomberg, early in the morning you get the usual, inaccurate analyst chatter: Sales of Existing Homes in U.S. Probably Climbed on Tax Credit

Sales of U.S. previously owned homes rose in May to the highest level in six months as buyers rushed to beat a June tax-credit deadline, economists said before a report today.

Purchases of existing houses, which are tabulated when a contract closes, increased 6 percent to a 6.12 million annual rate, according to the median of 73 forecasts in a Bloomberg News survey. To receive a government incentive worth as much as $8,000, buyers must have signed contracts by the end of April and need to complete deals by the end of this month.

Credit-induced gyrations will make the underlying health of the market difficult to determine over the next couple of months. A slump in builder shares since early May signals investors are concerned the damage caused by the end of government stimulus, mounting foreclosures and unemployment will exceed the benefits of lower mortgage rates.

Then the actual report comes out: Existing Home Sales in U.S. Unexpectedly Fell to 5.66 Million Rate in May

June 22 (Bloomberg) -- Sales of U.S. previously owned homes unexpectedly fell in May, a sign demand was probably pulled into prior months before a June tax-credit deadline.

Purchases of existing houses, which are tabulated when a contract closes, decreased 2.2 percent to a 5.66 million annual rate, figures from the National Association of Realtors showed today in Washington. To receive a government incentive worth as much as $8,000, buyers must have signed contracts by the end of April and need to complete deals by the end of this month.

The decline raises the risk the retrenchment following the expiration of the tax credit will be deeper than anticipated. A slump in builder shares since late April has exceeded the retreat in the broader market on concern the damage from the end of government stimulus, mounting foreclosures and unemployment may cause renewed weakness.

Now, this is the BoomBustBlog version from March of this year where I made it crystal clear that housing will fall further and significantly. The governmetn incentives are just market interference and pricing distortions, prolonging the pain: It’s Official: The US Housing Downturn Has Resumed in Earnest

Let’s take a look at some charts sourced from the upcoming BoomBustBlog subscriber “A Fundamental Investor’s Peek into the Alt-A and Subprime Market”should be released withing 24 hours or so. This release will include all of the raw data necessary for users to run their own calculation and draw their own conclusions. update, which

Click to enlarge
image202.png

...

In the chart above, you can see where CA has made some progress interms of appreciation. CA, FL, and NV account for nearly 50% of nationwide price damage. Let’s take a closer look…

Published in BoomBustBlog

Enjoy! Feel free to leave comments on the videos.

02:18

Robert Shiller suspects Australia is in a housing Bubble

10:00

In Australia, Tax as a Contagion

Australia: The Land Down Under(water in mortgage debt

As an extension of the Chinese macroeconomic discussion at BoomBustBlog throughout 2010, there may be an “Asian Contagion” spreading as a result of a Chinese investment slowdown.  Those at risk are the countries and regions that have supplied China with the commodities necessary to build empty cities.  While the (comparatively, in terms of GDP) enormous Chinese stimulus package from the first part of the financial meltdown in 2008 has generated incredible growth in GDP and asset prices, the game appears to be over for flipping 1000 square foot apartments in Shanghai.  After the direct hit taken to China, the picture looks very grim for Australia, where a bursting Chinese housing bubble could drive industrial commodities lower, sparking higher unemployment in one of the nation’s largest sectors, and in turn pop their domestic housing and property bubble.  In the near to medium term, Australia is showing some major red flags.

Australian property bubble, wikipedia


Australia: The Land Down Under(water in mortgage debt), pt. Deux: Which Banks to Short?

We looked into the four largest Australian banks – Australia and New Zealand banking Group Limited, Commonwealth bank of Australia, National Australia Bank Limited, Westpac Banking Corporation. All the banks, except Commonwealth bank of Australia, have ADR.

The banks are trading at very high multiples when compared with their US counterparts. The current average price-to-tangible book value of the four Australian banks is 2.5x against the current multiples of less than 1.5x for US banks. The Australian banks are enjoying a premium largely owing to lower charge-off rates, delinquency levels and the NPL levels than their US counterparts. While the housing loans account for a substantial portion of the total portfolio of Australian banks, the housing bubble in Australia is yet to burst to result in defaults in this sector. Also, the Australian banks have additional shelter from two factors:

  • The housing loans in Australia are recourse loans (borrowers are personally liable to pay even after foreclosure)
  • The loans given in excess of LTV (Loan-to-value) of 80% have Lender Mortgage Insurance which covers the losses of the lending bank

Published in BoomBustBlog

As a follow-up to our piece on the Australian macro outlook (Australia: The Land Down Under(water in mortgage debt), We looked into the four largest Australian banks - Australia and New Zealand banking Group Limited, Commonwealth bank of Australia, National Australia Bank Limited, Westpac Banking Corporation. All the banks, except Commonwealth bank of Australia, have ADR.

The banks are trading at very high multiples when compared with their US counterparts. The current average price-to-tangible book value of the four Australian banks is 2.5x against the current multiples of less than 1.5x for US banks. The Australian banks are enjoying a premium largely owing to lower charge-off rates, delinquency levels and the NPL levels than their US counterparts. While the housing loans account for a substantial portion of the total portfolio of Australian banks, the housing bubble in Australia is yet to burst to result in defaults in this sector. Also, the Australian banks have additional shelter from two factors:

  • The housing loans in Australia are recourse loans (borrowers are personally liable to pay even after foreclosure)
  • The loans given in excess of LTV (Loan-to-value) of 80% have Lender Mortgage Insurance which covers the losses of the lending bank

The average Texas ratio of the four Australian banks is 25% and average NPL coverage ratio ( NPL+90 days past due to allowance for loan losses) is 68%. While the NPLs and the past due loans of the Australian banks have increased over the last year, a major portion of the increase is coming from business loans and commercial property while the delinquency rates in residential mortgage in Australia have remained stable (except for Commonwealth bank where substantial increase has been seen in the past due loans in the housing sector). The reported delinquency rates for mortgage or housing loans in Australia for the four banks are summarized below.

  • Commonwealth bank of Australia – The total delinquent loans (1+ days past due) remained at 3.0% in 1H10, equal to the level of 3.0% in 1H09. However, owing to the aging of the some portion of the delinquent loans, the mortgage delinquency (90+ days) rate increased to 0.77% in 1H10 against 0.45% in 1H09 while the mortgage delinquency (30-80 days) rate remained stable at 0.86% and mortgage delinquency (less than 30 days) rate declined to 1.36% in 1H10 against 1.72% in 1H09.

The full analysis is available for download to subscribers below. Subscribers are also urged to review the Macro outlook document as well.

As excerpted from Australia: The Land Down Under(water in mortgage debt:

A few minutes ago, I posted an informational piece on Australia’s creeping protectionism in the form of taxing multi-national mining companies in ”In Australia, Tax as a Contagion“. This begs the questions, “Why is Australia So Tax Happy as to Potentially Chase Away Investment in the Down Under?” Well, the answer most likely is because it is actually a ”Land Down Under(water in mortgage debt) and foreign export reliance. We, at the BoomBust feel that the government is actually attempting to take a proactive stance in meeting the consequences of what is probably going to befall most export reliant countries which is why Brazil and Chile are strongly considering following suit!

As an extension of the Chinese macroeconomic discussion at BoomBustBlog throughout 2010, there may be an “Asian Contagion” spreading as a result of a Chinese

investment slowdown.  Those at risk are the countries and regions that have supplied China with the commodities necessary to build empty cities.  While the (comparatively, in terms of GDP) enormous Chinese stimulus package from the first part of the financial meltdown in 2008 has generated incredible growth in GDP and asset prices, the game appears to be over for flipping 1000 square foot apartments in Shanghai.  After the direct hit taken to China, the picture looks very grim for Australia, where a bursting Chinese housing bubble could drive industrial commodities lower, sparking higher unemployment in one of the nation’s largest sectors, and in turn pop their domestic housing and property bubble.  In the near to medium term, Australia is showing some major red flags.

Australian property bubble, wikipedia

Published in BoomBustBlog

A few minutes ago, I posted an informational piece on Australia's creeping protectionism in the form of taxing multi-national mining companies in "In Australia, Tax as a Contagion". This begs the questions, "Why is Australia So Tax Happy as to Potentially Chase Away Investment in the Down Under?" Well, the answer most likely is because it is actually a "Land Down Under(water in mortgage debt) and foreign export reliance. We, at the BoomBust feel that the government is actually attempting to take a proactive stance in meeting the consequences of what is probably going to befall most export reliant countries which is why Brazil and Chile are strongly considering following suit!

As an extension of the Chinese macroeconomic discussion at BoomBustBlog throughout 2010, there may be an “Asian Contagion” spreading as a result of a Chinese

Published in BoomBustBlog

This is the public version of our quarterly review of Alt-A and subprime mortgage performance sourced from the NY Fed and FDIC data. All paying subscribers can access the entire document here: 4Q09 Alt-A and Subprime commentary (452.33 kB 2010-05-21 05:49:09).

scap4q09

 

Foreclosures on First Lien Mortgages increased from 11.5% as on 31st October 2009 to 11.74% as on 31st January, 2010. Mortgage rates on Prime loans and Alt-A loans increased by 25bps and 21bps to 7.66% and 12.23% respectively over the same period. Delinquency rates for first lien mortgages on the other hand decreased by 7bps to 5.6%, for the quarter ended December 31, 2009.. While Net Charge-off rates for Alt-A loans increased by 2.12% points q-o-q to 30.49% as on 31st Dec 2009, delinquency rates dropped by 27bps over the same period to 12.1%

In case of Subprime loans, Net Charge off rates and Foreclosure rates, both rose to 44.6% and 15.6% respectively during 4Q09, compared to 42.9% and 15.4% during 3Q09. Delinquency rates declined from 26.4% in 3Q09 to 25.3% in 4Q09. Net charge of rates for HELOCs rose 13bps to 3.34% during 4Q09 while delinquency rates had a negligible decline.

Net charge-off rates and delinquency rates for Business Loans (C&I loans) marginally declined during 4Q09 remaining more or less constant at 2.5% and 4.5% respectively.

Delinquency rates under CRE loans remained steady during 4Q09 at 8.8% when compared with 3Q09. While delinquency rates for multifamily loans did not show any drastic changes in 4Q09, net charge-off rates under construction loans increased considerably from 6.3% in 3Q09 to 8.4% in 4Q09

Credit cards had a better quarter with net charge off rates and delinquency rates showing marginal improvements in 4Q09. Net charge off rates declined from 10.2% in 3Q09 to 9.5% in 4Q09, while delinquency rates declined from 6.6% to 6.4% over the same period.

Other consumer loans showed a healthier 2.7% net charge off rate in 4Q09 as against 3.2% in the previous quarter. Delinquency rate in this segment also improved marginally, declining by 19 bps to 3.5% in 4Q09.

Net charge-off rates and delinquency rates for Other loans marginally increased. While net charge off rates increased from 1.7% in 3Q09 to 1.8% in 4Q09, Delinquency rates remained constant at 1.1% over 4Q09.

Professional

Published in BoomBustBlog
Monday, 05 April 2010 00:00

Easter Weekend News Update

Canadian Dollar Too Strong? Bloomberg.com:

  • Minority opposition in Canadian Parliament is growing over strengthening Loonie
  • Leaders fear fallout in exports from CAD nearly at parity with USD
  • CAD strength is directly tied to Chinese commodity demand (is the CAD bubblicious, too?)

Relevant BoomBustBlog content (we gave you an explicit warning of this in early January): China's Most Expensive Export: Price Inflation

Ukraine is dangerously close to the brink http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601095&sid=aNw4Q7ntlMqc

  • Ukraine is about to use up the remainder of a $16.4 billion IMF loan
  • Premier Mykola Arazov has applied for another loan to "reform the economy" (what the hell did they do with the first $16.4 billion?)
  • Ukraine has needed assistance to make good with about 20 lenders

We have went through this in exquisite detail, both in the public sections of the blog and particularly in the subscriber-only content. See The Depression is Already Here for Some Members of Europe, and It Just Might Be Contagious! Professional and institutional subscribers should carefully reference "Banks Exposed to CEE & SEE" while all paying subscribers should review the "Greek Banking Industry Tear Sheet".

Published in BoomBustBlog

I will start posting more news topics of interest and welcome readers to forward research and investment ideas at will. Here is the crop from last week. I will post topics from the weekend later on today, and as usual will randomly comment on daily news events.

From Alliance Bernstein:

  • Core Intermediate Producer Prices have taken 6 months to rise 5.2% annualized, recession of 2002 took 2 years to reach same level
  • Operating Rate hit low of 65.4% last year and has only risen to 69.4%, still short of historical threshold causing rise in raw material prices (74%)
  • Increases in foreign operating rates have started to indicate US may now be a price follower instead of price leader
  • The Fed cited lack of resource utilization as reasoning for maintaining record low rates, as these concerns begin to wane Alliance Bernstein sees easing of emergency Fed policy

Bloomberg.com:

  • Christina Romer, Peter Orszag, and Tim Geithner have predicted unemployment will settle in 2010 at around 9.7%, citing poor job conditions
  • Federal deficit projections for 2011 & 2015 are $1.5 trillion & $751 billion respectively, White House officials cite Bush's medicare and income tax cuts for allowing deficit insanity
Published in BoomBustBlog

I've been telling readers and subscribers that the housing market has a considerable amount to fall before we reach income parity. With income currently falling along with rising underwriting standards, that point is actually being pushed even farther into the (event) horizon! We are now at a point where interested parties would be remiss in not pursuing blogs (both in addition to and instead of the mainstream media) to get the nitty gritty analysis on a wide variety of topics. With that being said, I have finally decided to bite the bullet and expand BoomBustBlog by accepting partners in a bid to grow the business. Lethargic media and financial concerns, look out, here comes the BLOGS!!! I am open to ideas and suggestions. Interested parties may contact me here.

From the WSJ.com: Home Resales Drop

The latest data on the housing market underscored its fragility and showed that a glut of homes for sale and a wave of foreclosures and fire sales are holding down housing prices...

Sales of existing homes fell 0.6% in February from a month earlier to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.02 million, the National Association of Realtors said...

The median price for an existing home was $165,100 in February, down 1.8% from February 2009, the Realtors said. Distressed homes, generally sold at discount, accounted for 35% of sales last month.

A separate report Tuesday from Federal Housing Finance Agency showed that house prices fell 0.6% in January and December's numbers were softer than previously reported. The FHFA index -- which tracks the prices of the same houses over time, but only those sold to or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or the Federal Home Loan Banks -- is 13.2% below its April 2007 peak.

Inventories of existing homes increased 9.5% at the end of the month to 3.59 million available for sale, the Realtors said. That represented a 8.6-month supply at the current sales pace, compared with a 7.8-month supply in January.

Of course this isn't news at all to the Green Shoots disbelieving BoomBustBlog subscriber. Excerpts from previous posts over the last quarter that ran in direct contravention of both mainstream media and sell side analyst reports are below:

Published in BoomBustBlog

I've been telling readers and subscribers that the housing market has a considerable amount to fall before we reach income parity. With income currently falling along with rising underwriting standards, that point is actually being pushed even farther into the (event) horizon! We are now at a point where interested parties would be remiss in not pursuing blogs (both in addition to and instead of the mainstream media) to get the nitty gritty analysis on a wide variety of topics. With that being said, I have finally decided to bite the bullet and expand BoomBustBlog by accepting partners in a bid to grow the business. Lethargic media and financial concerns, look out, here comes the BLOGS!!! I am open to ideas and suggestions. Interested parties may contact me here.

From the WSJ.com: Home Resales Drop

The latest data on the housing market underscored its fragility and showed that a glut of homes for sale and a wave of foreclosures and fire sales are holding down housing prices...

Sales of existing homes fell 0.6% in February from a month earlier to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.02 million, the National Association of Realtors said...

The median price for an existing home was $165,100 in February, down 1.8% from February 2009, the Realtors said. Distressed homes, generally sold at discount, accounted for 35% of sales last month.

A separate report Tuesday from Federal Housing Finance Agency showed that house prices fell 0.6% in January and December's numbers were softer than previously reported. The FHFA index -- which tracks the prices of the same houses over time, but only those sold to or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or the Federal Home Loan Banks -- is 13.2% below its April 2007 peak.

Inventories of existing homes increased 9.5% at the end of the month to 3.59 million available for sale, the Realtors said. That represented a 8.6-month supply at the current sales pace, compared with a 7.8-month supply in January.

 Of course this isn't news at all to the Green Shoots disbelieving BoomBustBlog subscriber. Excerpts from previous posts over the last quarter that ran in direct contravention of both mainstream media and sell side analyst reports are below:

 The chart below illustrates the seasonal ebbs of month to month price changes.  On a month to month basis, we see hills in the spring and summer and valleys in the fall and winter. During the onset of the bursting of the (first) bubble, this cycle was compressed, but was still there. and lasted throughout the bubble. With the onset of the government stimulus (ex. housing credits and MBS market manipulation), the peaks were significantly exacerbated. Now we are entering into the winter months again, and guess what's happening, as has happened nearly every winter cycle before. The only difference is that this dip is extraordinarily steep! I would also like to add that the month to month price changes coincide exactly with the S&P 500 move downward and upward for 2008 and 2009, to the MONTH! What a coincidence, huh? If this relationship holds,,,, well you see what direction the month to month lines are going and how steep they are, don't you?

csmtmlong.png

  image027.png

As you can see, the residential housing uptrend is now apparently over, and we are resuming the downward decent.

Let's look at the improvement in delinquencies and losses as compared to home prices in the grand scheme of things, a birds-eye view so to speak...

janimage032.png

For data heaving presentations and analysis, feel free to click the links below.

Reality Check for Bank Investors, Mortgage Investors and Home Buyers (March 10th)

It's Official: The US Housing Downturn Has Resumed in Earnest (March 2nd)

It's HELOC Deja Vu,All Over Again (January 19th)

A Fundamantal Investor's Peek into the Alt-A Market (Jan 14, 2010)

Deflation, Inflation or Stagflation - You Be the Judge! (January 12th)

If Anybody Bothered to Take a Close Look at the Latest Housing Numbers...

(December 30th, 2009)

Housing sales and prices come in lower than estimated! What??? (December 24th)

Residential Lending Credit Losses Worsen as Unsustainable Government Support Proves... Unsustainable (December 21st)

The Truth! The Truth? Banker's Can't Handle the Truth!!!

On the Latest Housing Numbers (November 24th)

I've been telling readers and subscribers that the housing market has a considerable amount to fall before we reach income parity. With income currently falling along with rising underwriting standards, that point is actually being pushed even farther into the (event) horizon! We are now at a point where interested parties would be remiss in not pursuing blogs (both in addition to and instead of the mainstream media) to get the nitty gritty analysis on a wide variety of topics. With that being said, I have finally decided to bite the bullet and expand BoomBustBlog by accepting partners in a bid to grow the business. Lethargic media and financial concerns, look out, here comes the BLOGS!!! I am open to ideas and suggestions. Interested parties may contact me here.

From the WSJ.com: Home Resales Drop

The latest data on the housing market underscored its fragility and showed that a glut of homes for sale and a wave of foreclosures and fire sales are holding down housing prices...

Sales of existing homes fell 0.6% in February from a month earlier to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.02 million, the National Association of Realtors said...

The median price for an existing home was $165,100 in February, down 1.8% from February 2009, the Realtors said. Distressed homes, generally sold at discount, accounted for 35% of sales last month.

A separate report Tuesday from Federal Housing Finance Agency showed that house prices fell 0.6% in January and December's numbers were softer than previously reported. The FHFA index -- which tracks the prices of the same houses over time, but only those sold to or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or the Federal Home Loan Banks -- is 13.2% below its April 2007 peak.

Inventories of existing homes increased 9.5% at the end of the month to 3.59 million available for sale, the Realtors said. That represented a 8.6-month supply at the current sales pace, compared with a 7.8-month supply in January.

 Of course this isn't news at all to the Green Shoots disbelieving BoomBustBlog subscriber. Excerpts from previous posts over the last quarter that ran in direct contravention of both mainstream media and sell side analyst reports are below:

 The chart below illustrates the seasonal ebbs of month to month price changes.  On a month to month basis, we see hills in the spring and summer and valleys in the fall and winter. During the onset of the bursting of the (first) bubble, this cycle was compressed, but was still there. and lasted throughout the bubble. With the onset of the government stimulus (ex. housing credits and MBS market manipulation), the peaks were significantly exacerbated. Now we are entering into the winter months again, and guess what's happening, as has happened nearly every winter cycle before. The only difference is that this dip is extraordinarily steep! I would also like to add that the month to month price changes coincide exactly with the S&P 500 move downward and upward for 2008 and 2009, to the MONTH! What a coincidence, huh? If this relationship holds,,,, well you see what direction the month to month lines are going and how steep they are, don't you?

csmtmlong.png

  image027.png

As you can see, the residential housing uptrend is now apparently over, and we are resuming the downward decent.

Let's look at the improvement in delinquencies and losses as compared to home prices in the grand scheme of things, a birds-eye view so to speak...

janimage032.png

For data heaving presentations and analysis, feel free to click the links below.

Reality Check for Bank Investors, Mortgage Investors and Home Buyers (March 10th)

It's Official: The US Housing Downturn Has Resumed in Earnest (March 2nd)

It's HELOC Deja Vu,All Over Again (January 19th)

A Fundamantal Investor's Peek into the Alt-A Market (Jan 14, 2010)

Deflation, Inflation or Stagflation - You Be the Judge! (January 12th)

If Anybody Bothered to Take a Close Look at the Latest Housing Numbers...

(December 30th, 2009)

Housing sales and prices come in lower than estimated! What??? (December 24th)

Residential Lending Credit Losses Worsen as Unsustainable Government Support Proves... Unsustainable (December 21st)

The Truth! The Truth? Banker's Can't Handle the Truth!!!

On the Latest Housing Numbers (November 24th)