More BoomBustBlog predictions rising to the forefront. As clearly stated in the Pan-European sovereign debt crisis, this is a pandemic contagion. The media's focus on specific countries must be mollified and modified. Reference the first five posts of the aforemetioned series, published a year and a half ago...

  1. The Coming Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis – introduces the crisis and identified it as a pan-European problem, not a localized one.

  2. What Country is Next in the Coming Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis? – illustrates the potential for the domino effect

  3. The Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis: If I Were to Short Any Country, What Country Would That Be.. – attempts to illustrate the highly interdependent weaknesses in Europe’s sovereign nations can effect even the perceived “stronger” nations.

  4. The Coming Pan-European Soverign Debt Crisis, Pt 4: The Spread to Western European Countries

  5. The Depression is Already Here for Some Members of Europe, and It Just Might Be Contagious!

Now, reference today's Bloomberg headlines - Spanish, French Debt Auctions Disappoint; Yields Rise: Yield spreads of Spanish and French 10-year government bonds over German equivalents hit euro-era highs on Thursday.

And from a very impressive and knowledgeable brother across the blogoshpere known as Ed Harrison, Chart of the day: Contagion spreads to the Netherlands | Credit Writedowns.com

Yesterday, I showed you that contagion had spread and default probabilities were blowing out right across Europe. Every single name on the list for sovereign credit default wideners was European and names like Austria, Estonia, and Slovakia showed marked deterioration, with default probabilities over 10%.

Today is no different. The Netherlands is the notable credit to deteriorate today. Their default probability has just crossed the 10% threshold. Take a look.

At the risk of repeating myself, I have to note that this is a rolling crisis through the euro zone. It will eventually infect every country until we get a systemic solution: full monetisation and union or break up. The longer the ECB waits, the worse things will get. No euro zone sovereign bond is safe.

Ed is absolutely, unequivocally correct - and not just because he agrees with me either (although that may be the primary reasonCool).

Update 1455 EST: There’s nothing wrong with the Netherlands. It’s indiscriminate selling. Warren Mosler reported this morning that he received this message from a AAA bond trading desk:

Our Trading Desk reports “mayhem” in the AAA Eurozone markets

- France 11bps wider

- Netherlands 6bps wider

France now 178bps over Germany

Increasing talk/fear of Eurozone break up and capitulation trades in AAA markets are widespread.

We are seeing no real demand for anything – even Germany.

Tomorrow’s Shatz auction looks a big ask with a yield of 30bps and no risk appetite out there.

These are not high yield punters here. They are AAA bond managers who thought they were buying safe assets. Because of the sovereign debt crisis, no eurozone sovereign bond is safe. So now there is panic.

I actually addressed this issue directly to Dutch investors and bankers in April. There may be more of a reason to panic than is being indicated above. If you haven't seen it, view the entire keynote speech delivered to the real estate investors in Amsterdam at ING's Valuation Conference in April of this year.

 ... Yes, real estate will take its fair share of banks down, again. Reference in detail, my post

Now that I have (quite honestly) issued my most sincerest thanks, let's attempt to remedy the shortcoming of the limited amounted of time that I had. You see, after the 3 minute hit ended there was a brief discussion of commercial real estate in which I didn't get to participate, thus I will take the liberty of doing so through this medium....

... Hmmmm! I walked through this in explicit detail in “When the Patina Fades… The Rise and Fall of Goldman Sachs??? and I did it without being privvy to Goldman’s financial innards. Long story short, practically all of the major banks are lying about the value of some of the largest assets on their books.

How many institutional and/or retail investors will be able to ferret out such? Or more importantly, why should they have to? It is the reporting company’s responsibility to report, not to obfuscate. The big problem with this “hide the market marks” thing is that markets tend to revert to mean. Unless said market values fundamentally catch up with said market prices, you will get a snapback. That is what is happening in residential real estate now. That is what happened in Japan over the last 21 years!!! That’s right, it wasn’t a lost decade in Japan, it was a lost 2.1 decades!

This has been the first balance sheet recession that the US has ever had, but there is precedence to follow. Japan had a balance sheet recession following their gigantic real asset bust. They made a slew of fiscal and policy errors, which essentially prolonged their real asset recession (now officially a depression) for T-W-E-N-T-Y  O-N-E long years! For those that may have  a problem reading that, it is 21 long years. What did the Japanese do wrong?
  • They refused to mark assets to market
  • They attempted to prop up zombie banks
  • They failed to promptly clean up NPAs in the banking system
  • They looked the other way in regards to real estate value shenanigans

... The retail investment banker Davidowitz had similar choice comments on this space: Davidowitz On Overt Optimism In The Retail Space And Mall REITs, Stuff Which We Have Detailed Often In The Past. The Dutch have a VERY similar problem on thier hands, but not all are paying attention.

Here is footage never released on the Web, but I felt that this is an opportune time to drill down into the Dutch market and explore the ramifications of this malaise as it relates to real estate and insurance.


Listen up people, HERE ARE THE NASTY FACTS!!!

Real estate is a highly rate sensitive asset class. Capitalization rates (the popular method of pricing real estate) is explained in Wikipedia as:

Capitalization rate (or "cap rate") is the ratio between the net operating income produced by an asset and its capital cost (the original price paid to buy the asset) or alternatively its current market value.[1] The rate is calculated in a simple fashion as follows:

 \mbox{Capitalization Rate} = \frac{\mbox{annual net operating income}}{\mbox{cost (or value)}}

Without going into a CRE class, when interest rates go up, cap rates generally go up as well and the value (or cost to purchase) of the property goes down in sympathy unless the rise in interest rates is offset by a commensurate or greater rise in net operating income. Now, either everybody believes that unemployment is going to drop towards zero  in an era of US austerity (reference Are the Effects of Unemployment About To Shoot Through the Roof? then see Budget AusterityGoldman Sees Danger in US Budget Cuts - CNBC) at the same time that historically low interest rates that actually went negative are going to get lower (see the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis) ---- or cap rates are about to skyrocket. I'll let you decide!

As you can see above, CRE drops in value whenever yields spike more than the + delta in NOI. Looking below, you can see that US CRE actually runs to the inverse of the 30 year Treasury.

That visual relationship is corroborated by running the statistical correlations...

The relationship is obvious and evident! In addition, we have been in a Goldilocks fantasy land for both interest rates and CRE for about 30 years. CRE culminated in the 2007 bubble pop, but was reblown by .gov policies and machinations. The same with rates. Ever hear of NEGATIVE interest rates where YOU have to PAY someone to LEND THEM MONEY!!!

So, BoomBustBloggers, where do YOU think rates are going to go from here? Up of Down??? Let's ask Portugal or any of the other PIIGS group. I have shown, very meticulously, how Portugal can not only afford the path that they are on (record high interest rates) but the losses that will come when they restructure (default) - for all to see. I have done the same with Spain, Ireland and Greece (for subscribers only). See The Truth Behind Portugal’s Inevitable Default – Arithmetic Evidence Available Only Through BoomBustBlog followed by The Anatomy of a Portugal Default: A Graphical Step by Step Guide to the Beginning of the Largest String of Sovereign Defaults in Recent History (December 6th & 7th, 2010).

Here is the contagion effect we are experiencing today, clearly foretold to the ING clients and banking executives in April of this year, from the banking perspective as opposed to the real estate perspective. Same difference, though... What was not caught in this video is the fact that the Dutch will bear the highest per capita costs for bailing out their more profligate brethren. You can imagine how enthused thery were to hear that tangy fact :-)

So, what's next? The US Follows Japan Into A Balance Sheet Recession: What Do Investors Know and Why Is It That Policymakers Appear Clueless? 

Will the Netherlands be very far behind? Will any country with a high debt load, high NPA/GDP ratios and underwater real estate truly trail very far? I doubt so, but hey... What the hell do I know? I simply called nearly every twist and turn of this debacle from the beginning of the real estate crash in the US to this point in the Pan-European sovereign debt crisis. See "Who is Reggie Middleton?" for more.

Online Spreadsheets (professional and institutional subscribers only)

Published in BoomBustBlog
So, Italy Sells 5-Year Bonds as Yield Surges to a Eurozone record and the inevitable continues to unfold as nearly all market participants continue to ignore basic arithmetic and common sense. Bloomberg reports:

Italy sold 3 billion euros ($4 billion) of five-year bonds, the maximum target, at the highest yield in more than 14 years as Mario Monti seeks to form a new government to restore investor confidence in public finances.

The Rome-based Treasury sold the bonds to yield 6.29 percent, the highest since June 1997 and up from 5.32 percent at the last auction on Oct. 13. Demand was 1.47 times the amount on offer, compared with 1.34 times last month.

... Monti, 68, accepted a mandate from President Giorgio Napolitano yesterday to succeed Silvio Berlusconi, who resigned as premier on Nov. 12 after defections eroded his parliamentary majority and the country’s 10-year bond yield surged over the 7 percent threshold that prompted Greece, Ireland and Portugal to seek bailouts. The yield on Italy’s benchmark 10-year bond was 6.4 percent at 11:15 a.m. in Rome after the auction, down from a euro-era record of 7.48 percent on Nov. 9.

Italy was forced to pay 6.087 percent on one-year bills at an auction on Nov. 10, the most in more than 14 years, amid the worsening European debt crisis. Monti, an economist and former adviser to Goldman Sachs Group Inc., will try to reassure investors that Italy can cut a 1.9 trillion-euro debt and spur economic growth that has lagged behind the euro-region average for more than a decade.

The country faces about 200 billion euros in bond maturities next year, more than twice as much as Spain, which has also seen yields surge on fallout from the debt crisis. The first bond redemption comes on Feb. 1, when Italy must pay back 26 billion euros for debt sold 10 years ago.

Whoa.. This was hard to see coming, wasn't it? Yeah, right. BoomBustBlog subscribers reference the explicit warning from early 2010 -

Italy public finances projection.

These severe devaluation in bonds definitely do take their toll, and not just on those who gorged on Grecian debt, as Bloomberg also reports UniCredit Posts a Record $14.5 Billion Loss on Impairments; Shares Tumble:

UniCredit SpA (UCG), Italy’s biggest bank, posted a record loss of 10.6 billion euros ($14.5 billion) in the third quarter after writing down goodwill on acquisitions and investments.

The stock fell as much as 9.6 percent as UniCredit unveiled a plan to raise as much as 7.5 billion euros by selling shares. The company took an impairment of 8.7 billion euros as it wrote off goodwill on purchases in Ukraine and Kazakhstan, UniCredit said in a statement today. The bank said it will exit non- strategic units, without elaborating.

Wider spreads on government bonds contributed to a 285 million-euro trading loss, the company said. The lender also scrapped its dividend for this year and plans 5,200 job cuts through 2015. UniCredit is raising money as it faces the biggest capital shortfall among Italy’s lenders, as ranked by the European Banking Authority last month.

“Our decision to write down the goodwill of several brands and to raise capital will reinforce the bank from both a balance-sheet and capital point of view,” Chief Executive Officer Federico Ghizzoni told reporters in Milan.

UniCredit shares were 6.3 percent lower at 77.3 cents as of 3:34 p.m. Milan time.

The lender said the goodwill charges won’t affect UniCredit’s cash and capital positions. UniCredit’s loan-loss provisions rose to 1.85 billion euros in the quarter from 1.63 billion euros a year earlier. Revenue declined 11 percent to 5.7 billion euros in the quarter.

The stock sale is part of UniCredit’s new business plan, which targets net income of 6.5 billion euros by 2015.

 Wow! What a surprise... Oh, my mistake... From Subscriber download dated February 2010, Italian Banking Macro-Fundamental Discussion Note, page 7 - Italian banks at risk!

You see, this is the problem. This Pan-European debacle has been moving in relatively slow motion and was very, very easily foreseeable. As a matter of fact, I have called it with nigh unerring precision from the first quarter of 2010. Reference the series of 40 or so articles starting in January of 2010, together known as Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis.

In The Coming Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis, dated Sunday, 07 February 2010 (please take notice of the date), I introduced the crisis and identified it as a pan-European problem, not a localized one. You see, the media and the sell side attempted to make this all about Greece when the reality of the matter was that it was anything but. This is a Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis, not a Greek, Irish or even Italian debt crisis. As excerpted:

Much of the analysis that I have seen fails to put enough weight on the bad loan/NPA issue in each country's respective banking system, which essentially is the cause of most of the countries' particular malaise to begin with. I have thrown together a crude, rudimentary chart to put this into perspective...

image021.pngimage021.pngimage021.png

When comparing these sovereigns using metrics that encompass more than the usual suspects, you get a clearer picture. The bank bailouts were expensive, arguably too expensive. It may have been better to let them fail in the market and nationalize them. Notice how the nations with the highest NPAs are doing the worst. In addition, one should remain cognizant that the "extend and pretend" game has allowed hundreds of billions of "phantom" NPAs to roam free in each of these countries' GDPs unrecorded. I believe there may be some surprises left in quite a few of the German banks. We will probably see if I'm right over the next few quarters. See German Recovery Stalls Unexpectedly in Fourth Quarter:German gross domestic product showed no growth in the final quarter of last year, official data showed on Friday, leaving Europe's largest economy on a weak footing going into 2010.

 And you wonder what happend to Unicredit???

In the piece What Country is Next in the Coming Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis?, dated Tuesday, 09 February 2010 (please take notice of the date) – I illustrated the potential for the domino effect, as excerpted:

It is beyond a hallucinogenic-induced pipe dream to even consider that the Eurozone will come out of this attempt at replicating the US "extend and pretend" policy intact and unscathed. The mere concept of global equity rallies should have macro traders and fundamental investors chomping at the bit. The US won't even get away with it, and we have the world's reserve currency printing press in our basement running with an ink-based, inter-cooled, twin-turbo supercharger strapped on that will make those German engineers green with envy, not to mention green with splattered printer ink as the presses go berserk!

In part 2 of my series on the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis, we will review Italy and Ireland in comparison to the whipping child of the media - Greece (see "The Coming Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis" for part one covering Greece and Spain along with tear sheets for the Spanish banks at risk for subscribers).

Click to enlarge...

italy_-_ireland.pngitaly_-_ireland.pngitaly_-_ireland.png

As seen above, Italy's gross debt as a % of GDP is worse than that of Greeces. Spain's stuctural balance is nearly as bad as Greece's and their GDP is heading backwards at a faster rate than Greece. Spain's high unemployment trumps all in the comparison, with Ireland coming a close second. Despite all of this, Greece has two to three times the CDS spread. Greece is a dress rehearsal for sovereign debt failure in several larger countries. Ireland is in very bad shape, and the UK is heavily levered into Ireland through the banking system and bonds (to the tune of $190 billion+) which exacerbates the issues that the UK already has (we will get to this in a future post). Spain and Italy combined are a sizeable chunk of the entire EU, and they are at risk. I say this just to keep things in perspective. We still have at least 9 or 10 more nations to review, and it doesn't necessarily get any better from here.

The worst has yet to come. With nearly all of Europe's banking system in the toilet, and roughly half a trillion Euros of mortgage loans coming due for rollover on a property market that is currently underwater with increasing vacancies, softening rents and a fukked macro outlook, pray tell what do you think will come of it?

Reggie Middleton Featured in Property EU, one of Europes leading real estate publicatios

Those who wish to download the full article in PDF format can do so here: Reggie Middleton on Stagflation, Sovereign Debt and the Potential for bank Failure at the ING ACADEMY-v2.


Of course, you can bet the farm on the industry group that will be hit second hardest by all of this, and yet somehow has not recieved nearly enough attention. Stay tuned, collapses commencing shortly. BoomBustBlog subscribers should hit the professional (professional only) addendum to the (all paying subscribers) icon Sovereign Debt Exposure of European Debt Exposed Industry (439.61 kB 2010-05-19 01:56:52) which can be found online here: Sovereign Debt Exposure Worksheets - Professional. I will be updating this list within a week.

Published in BoomBustBlog

Yes, this more of the hardest hitting investment banking research available focusing on Goldman Sachs (the Squid), but before you go on, be sure you have read parts 1.2. and 3: 

  1. I'm Hunting Big Game Today:The Squid On A Spear Tip, Part 1 & Introduction
  2. Hunting the Squid, Part2: Since When Is Enough Derivative Exposure To Blow Up The World Something To Be Ignored?"
  3. Reggie Middleton Serves Up Fried Calamari From Raw Squid: Market Perceptions of Real Risk in Goldman Sachs

So, what else can go wrong with the Squid? 

Plenty! In Hunting the Squid, Part2: Since When Is Enough Derivative Exposure To Blow Up The World Something To Be Ignored?" I included a graphic that illustrated Goldman's raw credit exposure...

So, what is the logical conclusion? More phallic looking charts of blatant, unbridled, and from a realistic perspective, unhedged RISK starring none other than Goldman Sachs...

 image006

And to think, many thought that JPM exposure vs World GDP chart was provocative. I query thee, exactly how will GS put a real workable hedge, a counterparty risk mitigating prophylactic if you will, over that big green stalk that is representative of Total Credit Exposure to Risk Based Capital? Short answer, Goldman may very well be to big for a counterparty condom. If that's truly the case, all of you pretty, brand name Goldman counterparties out there (and yes, there are a lot of y'all - GS really gets around), expect to get burned at the culmination of that French banking party
I've been talking about for the last few quarters. Oh yeah, that perpetually printing clinic also known as the Federal Reserve just might be running a little low on that cheap liquidity antibiotic... Just
giving y'all a heads up ahead of time...

And for those who may not be sure of the significance, please review my presenation as the Keynote Speaker at the ING Real Estate Valuation Seminar in Amsterdam, below. After all, for all intents and purposes, Dexia has officially collapsed - [CNBC] France, Belgium Pledge Aid for Struggling Dexia... and its a good chance that it's a matter of time before BNP follows suit - exactly as BoomBustBlog predicted for paying subsccribers way back in July.

A step by step tutorial on exactly how it will happen....

 The European banking debacle was predicted at the start of 2010, a full year and a half before this has come to a head. If I could have seen it so clearly, why couldn't the banking industry and its regulators?

Now, back to GS, and considering all of the European falllout coming down the pike, of which Goldman is heavily leveraged into, particulary France (say BNP/Dexia/etc.)...

image009

Let's go over exactly how GS is exposed following the logic outlined in the graphic before this series of videos, as excerpted from subscriber document Goldmans Sachs Derivative Exposure: The Squid in the Coal Mine?, pages 3,4 and 5.

GS__Banks_Derivatives_exposure_temp_work_Page_3

GS__Banks_Derivatives_exposure_temp_work_Page_4

GS__Banks_Derivatives_exposure_temp_work_Page_5

Booyah!

There you go. The markets and the media have concentrated on Morgan Stanely because Goldman has successfully hid much of its risk from those who didn't subscribe to BoomBustBlog. Of course, those who did subscribe picked up those puts ridiculosuly cheap, and are/will reap the benefits as the TRUTH goes VIRAL!

Those who wish to jump on the gravy train of our next US bank analysis featuring those susceptible to this malaise can subcribe here and now!

The many ways to reach Reggie Middleton:

  • Follow us on Blogger
  • Follow us on Facebook
  • Follow us on LinkedIn
  • Follow us on Twitter
  • Follow us on Youtube

Or simply email me.

Meet Reggie Middleton in person in NYC and London!

I will be hosting two BoomBustBlog meet and greets, for those who aren't too put off by my truthful, fact-based style. One in the next couple of weeks in a swank, pretty people laden lounge in downtown Manhattan, and the other potentially in London in mid-November - both wherein we sit down and chew the fat about things financial, global macro and socio-economic over drinks and heated debate. I will have plenty of gratis BoomBustBlog research there as well. Those who are interested should email the blog Customer Support for info.

Published in BoomBustBlog

Tuesday trading update from Eurocalypse...

The SP500 daily chart has the same pattern than CAC.a squeeze could lead us to 1240 but I don't see it really pushing any further out and I see the market being more heavy than Europe because we didn't sell off as hard.

sp500

Contrary to the CAC points (see Eurocalypse Trading Update 8/16/2011 - French Markets and The Inevitable Pan-European Real Estate Collapse), we didnt visit 2010 lows which are my target, so lets not talk about July 2009 lows just yet. The option set up and trading illustration given to subscribers last week still stands as the preferred method for those who trade optionable ETFs to best position themselves. All paying subscribers should download SPY option strategies in violent down moves for retail investors. We will review larger contract futures strategies for professional and institutional investors in the near future.

Fixed Income

While we believed that it's both rational and worthwhile to play the long US notes, Bunds (or Swap rates) as a positive carry trade to leverage the continuing debacle of western economies, these are profit taking levels for those momentum players and flight to quality traders, and perhaps even levels to cautiously try the short side. No, the strategy is not driven by the explosion of the ponzi that US debt or german debt, but simply an over extension of a trend. UST notes monthly charts shows we are in resistance zone.

On bunds, the German debt, there is still this joker that it is suddenly rerated as bad as PIIGS if Merkel gives in to support Italy and Spain (which she has shown she is thus far refusing to do in by refusing Eurobonds)...The short term mo-mo players are not looking at things this way. There is also this matter of the CRE rollovers that will either smash French and German banks, tank pan-European real estate, or the most likely option - both.

Things to watch

I think the stock market can tank in the short term only if the PIIGS crisis resumes abruptly. Is it possible ? Well of course, it is, but I think we'd see serious signs in the debt markets before the stock market reacts, as usual. I read that 22bn of PIIGS debt were bought last week, the fastest pace ever,
and a very significant amount. All the guys who sold, probably bought Bunds instead (they are bond funds, ALMs so if they sell an investment, they should
buy something else with the proceeds...). If ECB activity subsides, Bunds naturally lose some of their bid. and then the bid on PIIGS will be tested as Bunds' yield rise from here. Then the market could well call the ECB bluff and see how big their virtuo-synthetic inkjet powered pockets really are (from a political point of view, of course - they can literally print forever up until inflation scares them back - reference The Bull Argument For Europe Is Credible, Except For The Circular Argument: You Can't Solve Debt Problems With More Debt!!!). If these balls are not as deep as their virtual pockets, then....

Reggie's note:

Of interest, if we're correct in our fixed income outlook, that Pan-European CRE crash may well have ample company stateside. See my rant on over optimism in this space on CNBC: Reggie Middleton ON CNBC’s Fast Money Discussing Hopium in Real Estate.

As excerpted:

Listen up people, HERE ARE THE NASTY FACTS!!!

Real estate is a highly rate sensitive asset class. Capitalization rates (the popular method of pricing real estate) is explained in Wikipedia as:

Capitalization rate (or "cap rate") is the ratio between the net operating income produced by an asset and its capital cost (the original price paid to buy the asset) or alternatively its current market value.[1] The rate is calculated in a simple fashion as follows:

 \mbox{Capitalization Rate} = \frac{\mbox{annual net operating income}}{\mbox{cost (or value)}}

Without going into a CRE class, when interest rates go up, cap rates generally go up as well and the value (or cost to purchase) of the property goes down in sympathy unless the rise in interest rates is offset by a commensurate or greater rise in net operating income. Now, either everybody believes that unemployment is going to drop towards zero  in an era of US austerity (reference Are the Effects of Unemployment About To Shoot Through the Roof? then see Budget AusterityGoldman Sees Danger in US Budget Cuts - CNBC) at the same time that historically low interest rates that actually went negative are going to get lower (see the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis) ---- or cap rates are about to skyrocket. I'll let you decide!

As you can see above, CRE drops in value whenever yields spike more than the + delta in NOI. Looking below, you can see that US CRE actually runs to the inverse of the 30 year Treasury.

That visual relationship is corroborated by running the statistical correlations...

The relationship is obvious and evident! In addition, we have been in a Goldilocks fantasy land for both interest rates and CRE for about 30 years. CRE culminated in the 2007 bubble pop, but was reblown by .gov policies and machinations. The same with rates. Ever hear of NEGATIVE interest rates where YOU have to PAY someone to LEND THEM MONEY!!!

So, BoomBustBloggers, where do YOU think rates are going to go from here? Up of Down??? Let's ask Portugal or any of the other PIIGS group. I have shown, very meticulously, how Portugal can not only afford the path that they are on (record high interest rates) but the losses that will come when they restructure (default) - for all to see. I have done the same with Spain, Ireland and Greece (for subscribers only). See The Truth Behind Portugal’s Inevitable Default – Arithmetic Evidence Available Only Through BoomBustBlog followed by The Anatomy of a Portugal Default: A Graphical Step by Step Guide to the Beginning of the Largest String of Sovereign Defaults in Recent History (December 6th & 7th, 2010). Be sure to carefully and very thoroughly peruse the spreadsheet below to see the many scenarios present that show the NPV of investor losses due to haircuts and restructurings...

I have went through what is inevitable in the US from a fundamental perspective right here in New Amsterdam, just a tad bit before I brought the message across the pond to old Amsterdam.

{youtube}MukxtjCVc5o{/youtubbe}

Remember, unlike many, I have asserted since 2007: It's a Real Estate Depression!!!

Published in BoomBustBlog

Tuesday trading update from Eurocalypse...

The SP500 daily chart has the same pattern than CAC.a squeeze could lead us to 1240 but I don't see it really pushing any further out and I see the market being more heavy than Europe because we didn't sell off as hard.

sp500

Contrary to the CAC points (see Eurocalypse Trading Update 8/16/2011 - French Markets and The Inevitable Pan-European Real Estate Collapse), we didnt visit 2010 lows which are my target, so lets not talk about July 2009 lows just yet. The option set up and trading illustration given to subscribers last week still stands as the preferred method for those who trade optionable ETFs to best position themselves. All paying subscribers should download SPY option strategies in violent down moves for retail investors. We will review larger contract futures strategies for professional and institutional investors in the near future.

Fixed Income

While we believed that it's both rational and worthwhile to play the long US notes, Bunds (or Swap rates) as a positive carry trade to leverage the continuing debacle of western economies, these are profit taking levels for those momentum players and flight to quality traders, and perhaps even levels to cautiously try the short side. No, the strategy is not driven by the explosion of the ponzi that US debt or german debt, but simply an over extension of a trend. UST notes monthly charts shows we are in resistance zone.

On bunds, the German debt, there is still this joker that it is suddenly rerated as bad as PIIGS if Merkel gives in to support Italy and Spain (which she has shown she is thus far refusing to do in by refusing Eurobonds)...The short term mo-mo players are not looking at things this way. There is also this matter of the CRE rollovers that will either smash French and German banks, tank pan-European real estate, or the most likely option - both.

Things to watch

I think the stock market can tank in the short term only if the PIIGS crisis resumes abruptly. Is it possible ? Well of course, it is, but I think we'd see serious signs in the debt markets before the stock market reacts, as usual. I read that 22bn of PIIGS debt were bought last week, the fastest pace ever,
and a very significant amount. All the guys who sold, probably bought Bunds instead (they are bond funds, ALMs so if they sell an investment, they should
buy something else with the proceeds...). If ECB activity subsides, Bunds naturally lose some of their bid. and then the bid on PIIGS will be tested as Bunds' yield rise from here. Then the market could well call the ECB bluff and see how big their virtuo-synthetic inkjet powered pockets really are (from a political point of view, of course - they can literally print forever up until inflation scares them back - reference The Bull Argument For Europe Is Credible, Except For The Circular Argument: You Can't Solve Debt Problems With More Debt!!!). If these balls are not as deep as their virtual pockets, then....

Reggie's note:

Of interest, if we're correct in our fixed income outlook, that Pan-European CRE crash may well have ample company stateside. See my rant on over optimism in this space on CNBC: Reggie Middleton ON CNBC’s Fast Money Discussing Hopium in Real Estate.

As excerpted:

Listen up people, HERE ARE THE NASTY FACTS!!!

Real estate is a highly rate sensitive asset class. Capitalization rates (the popular method of pricing real estate) is explained in Wikipedia as:

Capitalization rate (or "cap rate") is the ratio between the net operating income produced by an asset and its capital cost (the original price paid to buy the asset) or alternatively its current market value.[1] The rate is calculated in a simple fashion as follows:

 \mbox{Capitalization Rate} = \frac{\mbox{annual net operating income}}{\mbox{cost (or value)}}

Without going into a CRE class, when interest rates go up, cap rates generally go up as well and the value (or cost to purchase) of the property goes down in sympathy unless the rise in interest rates is offset by a commensurate or greater rise in net operating income. Now, either everybody believes that unemployment is going to drop towards zero  in an era of US austerity (reference Are the Effects of Unemployment About To Shoot Through the Roof? then see Budget AusterityGoldman Sees Danger in US Budget Cuts - CNBC) at the same time that historically low interest rates that actually went negative are going to get lower (see the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis) ---- or cap rates are about to skyrocket. I'll let you decide!

As you can see above, CRE drops in value whenever yields spike more than the + delta in NOI. Looking below, you can see that US CRE actually runs to the inverse of the 30 year Treasury.

That visual relationship is corroborated by running the statistical correlations...

The relationship is obvious and evident! In addition, we have been in a Goldilocks fantasy land for both interest rates and CRE for about 30 years. CRE culminated in the 2007 bubble pop, but was reblown by .gov policies and machinations. The same with rates. Ever hear of NEGATIVE interest rates where YOU have to PAY someone to LEND THEM MONEY!!!

So, BoomBustBloggers, where do YOU think rates are going to go from here? Up of Down??? Let's ask Portugal or any of the other PIIGS group. I have shown, very meticulously, how Portugal can not only afford the path that they are on (record high interest rates) but the losses that will come when they restructure (default) - for all to see. I have done the same with Spain, Ireland and Greece (for subscribers only). See The Truth Behind Portugal’s Inevitable Default – Arithmetic Evidence Available Only Through BoomBustBlog followed by The Anatomy of a Portugal Default: A Graphical Step by Step Guide to the Beginning of the Largest String of Sovereign Defaults in Recent History (December 6th & 7th, 2010). Be sure to carefully and very thoroughly peruse the spreadsheet below to see the many scenarios present that show the NPV of investor losses due to haircuts and restructurings...

I have went through what is inevitable in the US from a fundamental perspective right here in New Amsterdam, just a tad bit before I brought the message across the pond to old Amsterdam.

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Remember, unlike many, I have asserted since 2007: It's a Real Estate Depression!!!

Published in BoomBustBlog

Note: This may be it for posting for the next 20 hours or so, for I have found what looks like the next TWO (That's right! Two as in number 2) Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearns sitting right there smack in the middle of plain site in Europe and I will need some time to work on it with my analysts. The meltdown should occur just as it did here in the US save the world 2nd largest hedge fund probably will not have the resources to pull that funny little, furry financial creature from the family Leporidae out of their hat like the world's largest hedge fund did in the case of Bear Stearn's and Lehman Brothers. For those of you who do not know, I called the collapse of both Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers months before the face while they were both trading at healthy stock prices, rated investment grade by "you know who" and rated "buy" by those whose name we shall not utter while still in the confines of downtown Manhattan!

bsc_vs_spx_for_reggie.gif

Bear Stearns collapsed in March of 2008, I first warned in September 2007, and gave explicit research and documentation to the public in January of 2008!

Correction, and further thoughts on the topic Posted on Sep 01, 2007 

Bear Fight - A most bearish view on Bear Stearns in a bear market:...at I did insinuate, or at least tried to, was that if real assets revert to mean valuations as I interpret them Bear Stearns will not be a prudent investment. As for institutions interested in portion... Sunday, 13 January 2008

 Here's the big Kahuna, Is this the Breaking of the Bear? January 2008


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Shortly after the "Bear fest", came the biggest foreeable bankruptcy in this nation's history. See "Is Lehman really a lemming in disguise?" and realize that this post was made on February 20th, when Goldman Sachs had a recommended price of about $55 while I warned that Lehman may be done for. This very similar to when I warned about the potential demise of Bear Stearns in January, when the rest of the Street had a "buy" at about $130 per share. Please click the graph to enlarge to print quality size.

Wait, there's much more...

Funny CLO business at Lehman .. loans into new securities. CLOs bought 60 percent of buyout loans before credit markets froze last year, said Mark Shafir, the global co-head of mergers and acquisitions at Lehman, in an ... Thursday, 03 April 2008

Lehman stock, rumors and anti-rumors that support the rumors... conspiracy, but if it pops 15% its due to ?????. Of course there are rumors and speculation floating around concerning Lehman, and I am sure a few short sellers may have whispered in someone's ear, BUT ... Friday, 28 March 2008

Of course, this all leads to the final conclusion, as illustrated in the seminal piece More on Lehman Brothers Dies While Getting Away with Murder: Introducing Regulatory Capture. Europe will soon learn a very, very valuable (albeit quite expensive and painful) lesson. That lesson is that lying is often really not worth it.

I will release preliinary findings on the suspect European banks in question, including names, prelimeary facts and figures to subscribers as soon as possible. This would make a very interesting topic for a FIRE sector compan annual board meeting as the keynote speaker, no? Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming of the mind and numbing of what was formerly called common sense...

Eighteen Percent of the EU is Literally Junk, Carried As Risk Free Assets at Par Using 30x+ Leverage: Bank Collapse is Inevitable!!!

So, the next domino falls in the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis. As has been the casse for much of the Asset Securitization Crisis and the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis, the ratings agencies have arrived to smoldering pile of ashes littered with charred bones and remnants of the putrid smell of burnt flesh with a fire hose and a megaphone yelling "Get out! We have word there may be a fire here!"

From Bloomberg: Ireland Debt Rating Cut to Junk, Adding Pressure for EU to Contain Crisis:

Ireland joined Portugal and Greece as the third euro-area nation to have its credit rating reduced to below investment grade as European Union finance ministers struggle to contain the region’s sovereign-debt crisis.

Moody’s Investors Service cut Ireland to Ba1 from Baa3, citing the probability that the country, which received a bailout last year, will need additional official financing and for investors to share in losses before it can return to the private market to borrow. The outlook remains “negative,” Moody’s said in a statement late yesterday.

Irish bonds dropped for a sixth day today after the downgrade, which came after European finance ministers failed to present a solution to the contagion that’s threatening to spread to Italy from the so-called peripheral euro-area states. Ireland’s debt agency said the downgrade will make it “more difficult” for Ireland to return to the market next year.

While Ireland “has shown a strong commitment to fiscal consolidation and has, to date, delivered on” the terms of its bailout, “implementation risks remain significant,” Moody’s said in the statement.

Irish 10-year bonds fell, pushing the yield on the debt up 31 basis points to 13.65 percent. The premium over German bunds widened 32 basis points to almost 11 percent. Italian yields were at 5.47 percent after surging above 6 percent earlier this week. The euro, which dropped to a four-month low against the dollar yesterday, rose 0.5 percent to $1.4049 as of 9:06 a.m. in London.

One must wonder what took Moody's so long to come to said conclusion. BoomBustBlog subscribers were well aware of Ireland's "Junk status" situation at least a year and a half ago. Outside of The Anatomy of a Serial European Banking Collapse nearly guaranteed scenario that I present last month, here are my thoughts starting July 2010:

For our professional and institutional subscribers, the Ireland Default Restructuring Scenario Analysis with Sustainable Debt/GDP Limits and Haircuts are available online. All subscribers have access tos the File IconIrish Bank Strategy Note which adequately warned before Irish banks dropped 85% in value. The File IconIreland public finances projections is also available to all paying members.

For those who don’t believe haircuts are possible, remember Denmark already took the clippers out. Ireland looks like they may be bluffing, but suppose their bluff is called???
From Bloomberg Today: Bondholder Haircut from Ireland May Shut Italy & Spain Out of Funding Markets

Ireland making good on its threat to impose losses on senior bank bondholders would precipitate a funding crisis for lenders across southern Europe, according to CreditSights Inc. “The fallout would be big and it would be bad,” said John Raymond, a London-based analyst at the independent research firm. “The senior unsecured market would shut down, at least for a while. Right now, the bigger and better Spanish and Italian banks can still access the market. That could end.”

... Pressure on bondholders to share the burden of banks’ losses is growing. In Denmark, the government inflicted so- called haircuts on senior creditors and depositors of regional lender Amagerbanken A/S, which failed after losing money on investments including real-estate loans. Moody’s Investors Service cut ratings of five Danish banks, including Danske Bank A/S, the country’s biggest, pushing up funding costs. Ireland’s government has similar powers to Denmark’s under the terms of its banking act.

And in other, seemingly forgotten news... Ireland Says Four Lenders Need $34 Billion After Stress Tests:

Irish regulators instructed four banks to raise 24 billion euros ($34 billion) in additional capital following stress tests on the nation’s lenders.

Of course, the most ironic point is that two of Ireland's big banks collapsed/were nationalized directly after passing the EU stress tests. Europe would be better off without the farce commonly known as stress tests for they simply undermine what very little credibilty TPTB (or at least the spokespersons for thesame) have left. 

And back to this most recent Bloomberg article...

Irish Bailout

Ireland was forced to seek an 85 billion-euro rescue from the European Union and the International Monetary Fund in November as a banking crisis overwhelmed the government.

The European Commission in Brussels said the downgrade “contrasts very much” with recent economic data and the “determined implementation of the program by the Irish government.” The Irish program is “fully on track,” it said.

Moody’s rationale for cutting Ireland echoed its review of Portugal, which was lowered to junk on July 5. European leaders may hold an extraordinary summit in two days in another attempt to stem the debt crisis, Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos and Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said separately yesterday.

Standard & Poor’s cut Ireland’s rating one level to BBB+ with a “stable” outlook on April 1. Fitch Ratings affirmed Ireland’s BBB+ rating on April 14 and removed it from “rating watch negative.” It said the outlook is negative. Both firms’ ratings are three levels above junk.

Ireland’s debt will rise to 118 percent of GDP in 2012 from 25 percent at the end of 2007, the European Commission has forecast. Taxpayers have pledged as much as 70 billion euros to shore up the country’s debt-laden financial system.

“Things need to get worse before they get better,” said Steven Lear, deputy chief investment officer at J.P. Morgan Asset Management’s Global Fixed Income Group in New York, who helps oversee $130 billion in assets. “There has to be a lot of pain before the alternative of pain seems palatable.” 

Oh, Mr. Lear, trust me, there will be plenty of pain to go around. The 2nd biggest hedge fund in the world (right behind the US Federal Reserve) is currently busting at the seems (literally) with junk! Think about it. There are 17 members of European Union, and 18% of those members are trading junk bonds as sovereign debt. These junk bonds (in some cases trading 50 cent on the Euro) are carried on HTM books at par, and have been purchased with 30x to 60x leverage. Care to calculate the losses, because I have. Once again, the endgame is The Anatomy of a Serial European Banking Collapse, but the prequel can be found in my many warnings that will lead up to that event, starting with the abject insolvency of the world's 2nd largest hedge fund - the ECB!:

Over A Year After Being Dismissed As Sensationalist For Questioning the ECB's Continued Solvency After Sovereign Debt Buying Binge, Guess What!

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Click, Clack, Click: The Sound of Falling Dominoes Behind The Door of the Eurocalypse!

UK banks abandon eurozone over Greek default fears

UK banks have pulled billions of pounds of funding from the eurozone as fears grow about the impact of a “Lehman-style” event connected to a Greek default.

 Senior sources have revealed that leading banks, including Barclays and Standard Chartered, have radically reduced the amount of unsecured lending they are prepared to make available to eurozone banks, raising the prospect of a new credit crunch for the European banking system.

Standard Chartered is understood to have withdrawn tens of billions of pounds from the eurozone inter-bank lending market in recent months and cut its overall exposure by two-thirds in the past few weeks as it has become increasingly worried about the finances of other European banks.

Barclays has also cut its exposure in recent months as senior managers have become increasingly concerned about developments among banks with large exposures to the troubled European countries Greece, Ireland, Spain, Italy and Portugal.

In its interim management statement, published in April, Barclays reported a wholesale exposure to Spain of £6.4bn, compared with £7.2bn last June, while its exposure to Italy has fallen by more than £100m.

One source said it was “inevitable” that British banks would look to minimise their potential losses in the event the eurozone crisis were to get worse. “Everyone wants to ensure that they are not badly affected by the crisis,” said one bank executive.

Moves by stronger banks to cut back their lending to weaker banks is reminiscent of the build-up to the financial crisis in 2008, when the refusal of banks to lend to one another led to a seizing-up of the markets that eventually led to the collapse of several major banks and taxpayer bail-outs of many more.

Eurocalypse Cometh! Principal Haircuts, Serial Bailouts, ECB Insolvent! Disruptive Sound Of Dominoes In Background Going "Click, Clack"! BoomBustBloggers Instructed To Line Up Bearish Positions Again! 

If one were to even come close to marking the EU banks books to reality, market prices, or anything in between, the Lehman situation would look tame in compariosn! As excerpted from the subscriber document: File Icon The Inevitability of Another Bank Crisis

Then there's the obvious twists from other impetuses:

And in the End, What Does It All Mean?

LGD 100+: What's the Possibility of Certain European Banks Having a Loss Given Default Approaching 100%? 

 

Published in BoomBustBlog

In continuing the discussion of trade setups and related strategies started with As Requested By Our Constituency: Trade Setups Based on BoomBustBlog Research, and continued in …

I bring you the next installation in the discussion of trading the Pan-European Sovereign Debt Crisis. The annotated email chain is actually quite long so it will be continuously broken up. I will also include the comments of the European equity trader in later posts. Any accomplished tradeer who wishes to join the crowdsourced debate is more than welcome to throw their hat into the ring.

Eurocalypse, the European CDS trader

At this stage i have a remark/question in your « the inevitability of a banking crisis »(dated when ?) you were waaay too optimistic (!!) seeing 172bn of losses related to PIIGS. We may be over that only on Greece exposure!

Reggie Middleton, the American Realist

For those that don't read me regularly, Eurocalypse is referring to my work below...

Is Another Banking Crisis Inevitable?

Attention subscribers: A new subscription document is ready for download File Icon The Inevitability of Another Bank Crisis

Banks NPAs to total loans

Source: IMF, Boombust research and analytics

Impact of bank’s banking books on haircuts

EU banking book sovereign exposures are about five times larger than trading book. The table below gives sovereign exposure of major European countries for both trading and banking book. The EU trading book has €335bn of exposure while banking book has €1.7t exposure towards sovereign defaults. EU stress test estimated total write-down’s of €26bn as it only considered banks trading portfolio. This equated to implied haircut of 7.9% on trading portfolio with losses equating to 2.4% of Tier 1 capital. However, if the same haircuts (7.9% weighted average haircut) are applied to banking book then the loss would amount to €153bn equating to 13.8% of Tier 1 capital.

We have also presented an alternative scenario since we believe that EU stress test had failed not only to include banks HTM books but also the loss estimates were highly optimistic, as has much of the economic and financial forecasting that has come from the EU. It is highly recommended that readers review Lies, Damn Lies, and Sovereign Truths: Why the Euro is Destined to Collapse! for a detailed view of a long pattern of unrealistically optimistic forecasting. Here's and example...

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Revisions-R-US!

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In an alternative scenario, we have assumed weighted average haircut of 10% (exposure, haircut assumptions and writedowns for individual countries are presented in detail in the tables below) and have applied writedowns on both banking and trading books with the results available in the subscription document File Icon The Inevitability of Another Bank Crisis? Individual and more explicit haircut calculations are available for the following nations for professional and institutional subscribers:

Eurocalypse, the European CDS trader

Certainly, if we compare the fiscal trajectory of the Eurozone as a whole with the US, the US is not really on a better path. Austerity has started in Europe. US seems still in full spending spree.

Reggie Middleton, the American Realist

I disagree, in a way. The US situation is truly FUBAR, indeed, but it is a slightly differently  FUBAR'd than the EU. The US still:

  1. is the world's reserve currency,
  2. has the world's pre-eminent military and technological forces (which go hand-in-hand with number 1, hence is essentially the same thing if history is any indicator),
  3. has a much more contiguos economy than the EU,
  4. although is prone to lie about its book keeping situation, is definitely not as detached from reality as the EU states. Reference:
  5. Lies, Damn Lies, and Sovereign Truths: Why the Euro is Destined to Collapse!,
  6. Once You Catch a Few EU Countries "Stretching the Truth", Why Should You Believe Any Others

  7. LGD 100+: What's the Possibility of Certain European Banks Having a Loss Given Default Approaching 100%?

Then there is the commercial real estate issue looming in the EU. The two strongest economies in the EU are being looked to pull the rest of the EU out of the fire through bailouts, but the ugly truth is that they are tied to the proflicate (and not so profligate, but still hampered) states by the waist. Outside of the (borderline recessionary) EU being their major trading partner(s), they have pretty much bankrolled CRE lending throughout the entire trading block. Those loans are due to be rolled over, and they are due to be rolled over on property that has materially declined in value - leaving a significant equity gap. We're talking close to 70% to 80% of CRE loans coming due in the next year and a half on properties that have significant oversupply, weakening rents, recesionary economies, sovereign debt issues and staunch austerity plans, and generally devalued properties leaving many a loan underwater. Haircuts, anyone? Inflation Misconceptions Hide A Downright U-G-L-Y Real Estate Landscape! - Part 1

You see, there is a highly reflexive relationship between overvalued sovereign debt held on a higly leveraged basis on EU bank balance sheets and CRE loans coming due on devalued and underwater real estate. The sovereign debt crisis is straining lending capacity at the same time that excess lending capacity is needed to fund underwater property loans that need to be rolled over. No one is discussing the real estate portion of the EU banking crisis to be, but it is very real!

I have delved deeply into this topic during my lectures in Amsterdam. Reference my featured article in Property EU, one of Europes leading real estate publicatios

Those who wish to download the full article in PDF format can do so here: Reggie Middleton on Stagflation, Sovereign Debt and the Potential for bank Failure at the ING ACADEMY-v2.

Now, the US is in a similar situation, but we have managed to fudge the books to such an extent that some of our CRE investors have actually risen in price. See The Conundrum of Commercial Real Estate Stocks: In a CRE "Near Depression", Why Are REIT Shares Still So High and Which Ones to Short?

With the dearth of synthetic profit streams to support accounting earnings (as banks did in their supposed recover of 2009/10), Weakening Revenue Streams in US Banks Will Make Them More Susceptible To Contingent Risks. I believe, due to major policy errors in dealing with our crash, that we will see our own lost decade(s) in the US...

There are those who believe US CRE is on a bullish trend, but I believe they have been mislead by accounting and regulatory shenanigans. Commercial real estate rarely thrives in high unemployment, increasing interest rates, stagflationary, sluggish economic times. Then again, maybe I'm wrong... Reggie Middleton ON CNBC's Fast Money Discussing Hopium in Real Estate

 

The US CRE situation is overshadowed (and possibly rightfully so) by the popular realization that Reggie was accurate in his 2007 assertions that we are in a residential real estate depression, further complicating any truly organica economic recovery - at least until true price discovery is allowed by the financial markets central planning cartel of government and central bankers. Reference:

  1. Reggie Middleton's Real Estate Recap: As I Have Clearly Illustrated, It's a Real Estate Depression!!!

  2. The "American Realist" Says: Past as Prologue - Re-blown Bubble to Pop Before the Previous Bubble Finishes Popping!!!!

  3. The Residential Real Estate Week in Review, or I Told You We're In A Real Estate Depression! The MSM is Just Catching Up

  4. There's Stinky Gas Inside Of This Mini-Housing Bubble, You Don't Want To Be Around When It Pops!

  5. Bubble, Bubble, Real Estate Toil and Trouble: Macro Climate for Real Estate Still Sucks, Despite New Bubbles

As this discussion/debate is getting rather lengthy, it will be continued in a later post. In the meantime, interested readers can follow me on twitter or subscribe to BoomBustBlog directly.

Published in BoomBustBlog

On 5/24/11 I recorded a podcast interview with the Sound of Money, an interesting financial show that airs on NYC's WNYE radio. You can listen to 46 and a half minutes of my viewpoints and opinions via this link, Sound-money-interview-of-reggie-middleton-05-24-11. Be sure to peruse the blog of the show as well.

 

Published in BoomBustBlog

Summary: I called it the coming RE Depression in 2007! I put MY money where my mouth was and sold off all of my investment real estate. I put YOUR money where my mouth was and shorted all that had to do with real estate (REITs, banks, builders, insurers). I called almost every major bank collapse months in advance. I warned the .gov bubble blowing does not = organic economic recovery. Now I'm saying we need to, and will, continue what's left of the crash of 2009, with ample global company. There will be no RE recovery this year, and there will be a crash. OK, you heard it here!

First, let's go through the headlines for the day then proceed to breadcrumb trail that clearly led us to where we are now and where we will ultimately end (oh yeah, In Case You Didn’t Get The Memo, The US Is In a Real Estate Depression That Is About To Get Much Worse Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011)

...

Commercial Real Estate

US Commercial Real Estate Prices Decline to Post-Crash Low ...‎ - Bloomberg

U.S. commercial property prices fell to a post-recession low in March as sales of financially distressed assets weighed on the market, according to Moody’s Investors Service.

 

The Moody’s/REAL Commercial Property Price Index dropped 4.2 percent from February and is now 47 percent below the peak of October 2007, Moody’s said in a statement today.

 

The national index has fallen for four straight months as sales of distressed properties hurt real estate values. Investor demand is strongest for well-leased buildings in such major markets as New York and Washington as vacancy rates decline and the economy grows.

 

The index “continues to bounce along the bottom as a large share of distressed transactions preclude a meaningful recovery of overall market prices,” Tad Philipp, Moody’s director of commercial real estate research, said in the statement. “Indeed, the post-peak low in price has been reached in the same period as a post-peak high in distressed transactions has been recorded.”

 

So-called trophy properties in New York, Washington, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco are helping those markets avoid the drag caused by distressed asset sales nationwide, Moody’s reported. Prices of properties of $10 million or more have risen 23 percent since their July 2009 low, according to a separate report issued today.

 

No Recovery Signals

 

The overall index shows “no sign of recovery,” Moody’s said.

 

Almost a third of all March transactions measured by Moody’s were considered distressed, meaning the properties’ owners faced foreclosure, had difficulty covering their mortgage payments or experienced other financial problems. It was the largest proportion of distressed property sales in the history of the index, Moody’s said.

For all of those wondering how CRE can be doing so bad while REITs are doing so well, well I explained it in explicit detail several times in the past. Once we eliminate rampant fraud and bring back mark to market, all will be good again...

  1. The Conundrum of Commercial Real Estate Stocks: In a CRE “Near Depression”, Why Are REIT Shares Still So High and Which Ones to Short?

Published in BoomBustBlog

Note: This is a very long post, and would have been longer if I didn't decide to break it up into pieces. I am presenting plenty of background material in it that regular readers have probably seen before because the subject matter is so pertinent to asset values both today, and tomorrow. I suggest those with interest in the real estate and/or banking arena read it in its entirety. The latter portion of the post is all new material that leads into valuations of real CRE properties that are currently on the market and ties in seemingly unrelated issues such Portugal's bailout and Greece's inevitable restructuring.

Last night, I spent an interesting time with the esteemed  and world reknown macro economist, entrepreneur, NYU professor and strategist,  Dr. Nouriel Roubini. Nouriel is a very, very bright guy. He has to be, he agrees with many of my viewpoints :-). Dr. Roubini had a client reception at his downtown loft in NYC. It was a delightful affair, plenty of heavy thinkers, a bevy of beautiful women, engaging debate of things geopolitical, macro-economic and financial... and of course at least one trouble maker. That would be that tall handsome fella in the middle who had the nerve, after Roubini literally deadened the room with his proclamations of what could come in the case of China crash, European default or US hard landing, to actually burst out and say the esteemed economist was actually being TOO OPTIMISTIC!

Hmmm, and they have the nerve to call Roubini Dr. Doom. Don't they know Dr. Doom wears a mask, a suit of armor, and is truly no joke?.

Published in BoomBustBlog