Using Veritas to Construct the "Per…

29-04-2017 Hits:84581 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

Using Veritas to Construct the "Perfect" Digital Investment Portfolio" & How to Value "Hard to Value" tokens, Pt 1

The golden grail of investing is to find that investable asset that provides the greatest reward with the least risk. Alas, despite how commonsensical that precept seems to be, many...

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The Veritas 2017 Token Offering Summary …

15-04-2017 Hits:79050 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

The Veritas 2017 Token Offering Summary Available For Download and Sharing

The Veritas Offering Summary is now available for download, which packs all the information about Veritas in a single page. A step by step guide to purchasing Veritas can be downloaded here.

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What Happens When the Fund Fee Fight Hit…

10-04-2017 Hits:78902 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

What Happens When the Fund Fee Fight Hits the Blockchain

A hedge fund recently made news by securitizing its LP units as Ethereum-based tokens and selling them as tradeable (thereby liquid) assets. This brings technology to the VC industry that...

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Veritaseum: The ICO That's Ushering in t…

07-04-2017 Hits:83382 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

Veritaseum: The ICO That's Ushering in the Era of P2P Capital Markets

Veritaseum is in the process of building peer-to-peer capital markets that enable financial and value market participants to deal directly with each other on a counterparty risk-free basis in lieu...

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This Is Ground Zero for the 2017 Veritas…

03-04-2017 Hits:79949 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

This Is Ground Zero for the 2017 Veritas Offering. Are You Ready to Get Your Key to the P2P Capital Markets?

This is the link to the Veritas Crowdsale landing page. Here is where you will be able to buy the Veritas ICO when it is launched in mid-April. Below, please...

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What is the Value Proposition For Verita…

01-04-2017 Hits:82259 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

What is the Value Proposition For Veritas, Veritaseum's Software Token?

 A YouTube commenter asked a very good question that we will like to take some time to answer. The question was, verbatim: I've watched your video and gone through the slides. The exchange...

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This Real Estate Bubble, Like Some Relat…

28-03-2017 Hits:53236 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

This Real Estate Bubble, Like Some Relationships, Is Complicated...

CNBC reports US home prices rise 5.9 percent to 31-month high in January according to S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller. This puts the 20 city index close to an all time high, including...

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Bloomberg Chimes In With My Warnings As …

28-03-2017 Hits:81258 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

Bloomberg Chimes In With My Warnings As Landlords Offer First Time Ever Concessions to Retail Renters

Over the last quarter I've been warning about the significant weakness in retailers and the retail real estate that most occupy (links supplied below). Now, Bloomberg reports: Manhattan Landlords Are Offering...

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Our Apple Analysis This Week - This Comp…

27-03-2017 Hits:81269 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

Our Apple Analysis This Week - This Company Is Not What Most Think It IS

We will releasing our Apple forensic analysis and valuation this week for subscribers (click here to subscribe - lowest tier is the same as a Netflix subscription). As can be...

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The Country's First Newly Elected Lame D…

27-03-2017 Hits:81074 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

The Country's First Newly Elected Lame Duck President Will Cause Massive Reversal Of Speculative Gains

Note: Subscribers should reference  the paywall material here for stocks that should give a good risk/reward scenario for bearish trades. The Trump administration's legislative outlook is effectively a political desert, with...

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Sears Finally Throws In The Towel Exactl…

22-03-2017 Hits:86922 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

Sears Finally Throws In The Towel Exactly When I Predicted "has ‘substantial doubt’ about its future"

My prediction of Sears collapsing once interest rates started ticking upwards was absolutely on point.

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The Transformation of Television in Amer…

21-03-2017 Hits:84938 BoomBustBlog Reggie Middleton

The Transformation of Television in America and Worldwide

TV has changed more in the past 10 years than it has since it's inception nearly 100 years ago This change is profound, and the primary benefactors look and act...

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John Hussman of the Hussman Funds writes :

The provision of a "non-recourse" loan is outside of the Fed's mandate under the Federal Reserve Act. Specifically, the Fed agreed to provide a $30 billion “non-recourse loan” to J.P. Morgan, secured only by the worst tranche of Bear Stearns' mortgage debt. This is not in fact a loan - if it were, J.P. Morgan would be required to pay it back, unless J.P. Morgan itself was to fail. Instead of a loan, this is a "put option," which protects J.P. Morgan from losses on the collateral, regardless of J.P. Morgan's own financial status. You've heard an iteration of this from me several times.

2) The effect of the Fed's guarantee is not to protect the public, but to protect Bear Stearns' bondholders. By purchasing Bear Stearns, J.P. Morgan will take on the responsibility for paying off about $75 billion in claims to the short- and long-term bondholders of Bear Stearns. Yet J.P. Morgan requires only $30 billion from the Fed do this. This suggests that Bear Stearns' "book" of positions (excluding liabilities to Bear's own bondholders) would be worth at least $45 billion if transferred, netted, or otherwise settled. There is no reason that the public should take a loss at all. Rather, the book should indeed be sold to JPM or a competing acquirer, and the proceeds (probably far in excess of $45 billion) should be used to pay the senior claims of bondholders. Any excess over $75 billion would be a residual for stockholders. Simply put, the bondholders of Bear Stearns, not the public, should absorb any loss.

The deal is being defended on the notion that the global financial system would have "failed" had Bear Stearns not been rescued. But the orderly transfer, netting and settlement of financial derivatives and other "qualified financial contracts" (QFCs) is precisely what Title IX of the Bankruptcy Act of 2005 was written to facilitate. In effect, the Federal Reserve and the Treasury decided to ignore existing law and provide a bailout to the benefit of Bear Stearns' bondholders at public expense.

The clear historical role of the Federal Reserve has been to manage the composition of Federal liabilities (by varying the mix of Treasury securities and monetary base - currency and bank reserves - held by the public). The recent transaction is a dangerous break from that role, in which unelected bureaucrats are committing public funds to facilitate private business transactions and selectively defend the holders of corporate securities. Only Congress has the Constitutional right, by the representative will of the people, to commit public funds. The Bear Stearns deal is a dangerous precedent and a dilution of Congressional prerogative.

Investors should not be in constant fear that the global financial system will “melt down” in the event of the bankruptcy of one large financial company or another. Though Bear Stearns apparently had the highest gross leverage (total assets to shareholder equity) among the large financials, and thereby provided a thin wall of defense for its stockholders, there was never a significant risk that the company would default on its obligations to customers and counterparties. Large U.S. financial companies are sufficiently well-capitalized that even in the event of outright bankruptcy, the only parties subject to loss are the stockholders and the bondholders of that particular company. The only instance in which this would not be the case is if the book value of the company was negative even after zeroing out all stockholder equity, long-term debt, and unsecured short-term debt.

In short, investors should have confidence in the ability of the capital markets to function without the need for government bailouts at public expense.

 

Click the link to see the rest of his commentary.